Celebrating Pi Day: What pie charts can tell us about gender gaps in control over land

In recognition of Pi Day (Greek letter π), celebrated each March 14th (03/14), here are some pie charts to illustrate key findings on gender gaps in control over land.  Some recent surveys collect information on who within households owns land, allowing us to analyze the gender gaps. 

Strengthening women’s land rights: what does data have to do with it?

Written for and originally published by the Thrive blog The call for International Women’s Day 2016 asks people to Pledge for Parity. The pledge offers five components: help women and girls achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious bias, call for gender-balanced leadership, value women and men’s contributions equally, and create inclusive, flexible cultures. While all of these are >> Read more

How sex-disaggregated land statistics can help monitor progress of the new Sustainable Development Goals

For decades feminist economists and women’s rights advocates have made the case that the lack of data on women’s land rights has limited the ability to understand how this affects food security and rural poverty. However, recent developments may help us to overcome this challenge. The new SDGs have identified women’s land rights as a >> Read more

Debunking the myth of female labor in African agriculture

Identifying opportunities for productive investments in women The widely cited “fact” that women in Africa provide 60-80% of the labor in agriculture is the latest of a set of claims that have been called into question about women’s contributions in agriculture based on new data from six sub-Saharan African countries. These studies offer our most >> Read more

Are women rice farmers in Latin America?

This seemingly straightforward question is quite difficult to answer.  On smallholder farms, all family members generally play important roles in agricultural production.  But farm surveys typically interview men under the assumption that men are the household head, landholders, and farmers (see Deere, Alvarado, and Twyman 2012). This implicitly implies that women are not considered farmers, >> Read more