Discussion paper: What is the role of men in connecting women to cash crop markets? Evidence from Uganda

Programs that seek to increase women’s participation in marketing activities related to the principal household economic activity must involve men if they are to be successful. The new IFPRI Discussion Paper analyzes take-up of a project that sought to increase women’s involvement in sugarcane marketing and sales by encouraging the registration of a sugarcane block contract in the wife’s name.

New paper on relationship between autonomy and decision making contributes to understanding and measurement of women’s empowerment

Despite widespread agreement on the importance of women’s empowerment, ambiguity still exists about how best to define and measure it. Authors of the new paper use a framework developed by psychologists and data from Bangladesh and Ghana to examine if intrahousehold decision making (sole or joint) is correlated with autonomous motivation.

New paper explores how grassroots approaches to collective action and conflict prevention can increase social-ecological resilience in Guatemala

The authors use the example of the Buena Milpa agricultural development project to demonstrate how grassroots approaches to collective action, conflict prevention, and social-ecological resilience, linking local stakeholder dynamics to the broader institutional and governance context, can bear fruit amidst postconflict development challenges.

New paper explores how big cities, small towns affect poor farmers in Africa

Rapid urbanization in developing countries stimulates interest in understanding the impact of the nature of urbanization on the economies of these countries. The new study investigates relationship between agriculture and different sized cities in Ethiopia, with focus on teff market.

Do men and women benefit equally from technology adoption? New paper explores

Researchers have sought to understand what keeps women’s observed rates of agricultural technology adoption low. But what happens after a new technology is adopted by a household? Do women’s lives really become better? Are they more empowered? A new paper explores these questions using the example of adopting small-scale irrigation technologies in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Tanzania.