Cash Transfers coupled with Behavior Change Communication sustainably reduce violence against women

Direct cash transfers coupled with behavior change communication can reduce violence against women inflicted by their partners by 26 percent, according to a landmark study in Bangladesh conducted by researchers at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and Cornell University. The reductions in violence were found 6-10 months after the intervention ended, providing the first evidence that such benefits can be sustained after cash transfers and related programming cease.

Ag-Incentives Consortium improves global data on agricultural policies

A group of leading international organizations joined with IFPRI and PIM in 2013 to form the Agricultural Incentives  Consortium (Ag-Incentives). The new PIM Outcome Note summarizes how the partnership evolved and how the results of this effort help policy makers, researchers, and other stakeholders.

WEBINAR: Do medium and large-scale farms generate income spillovers for rural households? The case of Tanzania

Land acquisitions by foreign and local investors has generated much speculation about the impacts on smallholder households and rural communities. In our webinar on November 6, Jordan Chamberlin (CIMMYT) will present a study that aims to determine the impact of farm structure on rural household incomes in Tanzania. REGISTER>>

Policy seminar: Past, present, and future of the commons

There is a long history of common property, which we can define as resources held and managed collectively by a group. But what is their relevance for today … and for tomorrow? An Oct. 4 IFPRI policy seminar, held to mark the first World Commons Week, provided perspectives on past, present, and future challenges and opportunities.

A bureaucratic catch-22: Study in Bangladesh shows how safety nets can overlook the poorest

An IFPRI analysis of the Bangladesh's Vulnerable Group Development (VGD) program, which provides assistance to poor women in rural areas, revealed flaws in the standards used to target recipients and recommended new criteria, which the government will begin using in 2019.

Discussion paper: What is the role of men in connecting women to cash crop markets? Evidence from Uganda

Programs that seek to increase women’s participation in marketing activities related to the principal household economic activity must involve men if they are to be successful. The new IFPRI Discussion Paper analyzes take-up of a project that sought to increase women’s involvement in sugarcane marketing and sales by encouraging the registration of a sugarcane block contract in the wife’s name.