New ASTI/AWARD portal supports women’s representation in African agricultural research

Women contribute important insights in agricultural research. Whether as government researchers, university professors, or senior research managers, their perspectives are essential for addressing the unique and pressing challenges of all farmers, particularly female farmers. Hiring women can also help alleviate staffing shortages in many African agricultural research agencies. These are a few of many good >> Read more

Discussion paper: The Abbreviated Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (A-WEAI)

The fifth Sustainable Development Goal—to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”—reflects a growing consensus that these are key objectives of development policy in their own right, while also contributing to improved productivity and increased efficiency, especially in agriculture and food production. To deliver on this commitment to women’s empowerment in development calls >> Read more

He says, she says: Exploring patterns of spousal agreement in Bangladesh

Participation in household decisions and control over assets are often used as indicators of bargaining power. Yet spouses do not necessarily provide the same answers to questions about these topics. In their discussion paper “He says, she says: Exploring patterns of spousal agreement in Bangladesh”, authors Kate Ambler, Cheryl Doss, Caitlin Kieran, and Simone Passarelli >> Read more

Mixed methods research in action: Using qualitative methods to complement quantitative approaches

Questions about the practical advantages and how-to’s of mixed-methods research are often posed by researchers who plan to collect quantitative data and are considering whether to add a qualitative component. Benefits of qualitative research stretch far beyond enhancing the interpretation of quantitative results and may even lead to greater publication and funding opportunities from richer >> Read more

Women’s access to land in Ghana: Are we asking the right questions, drawing the right conclusions?

With increased recognition of the importance of gender in development, researchers now often collect data disaggregated at the individual or intra-household level, sometimes with a great amount of detail involved. Yet, once in a while we may need to step back and reflect whether we are asking the right questions and whether we are making >> Read more