WEBINAR: Aspirations, trust, and poverty reduction

Understanding the psychological dimensions of poverty is critical for understanding how to alleviate it. This webinar with Katrina Kosec on Dec 19 will highlight novel research on two psychological phenomena that are closely linked with experiencing poverty and economic vulnerability: 1) having low aspirations, or ambitions, for the future, and 2) having low levels of trust or confidence in one’s government.

Why is social protection important for agriculture and resilience? Watch our colleagues explain! (Part 1, Daniel Gilligan)

In this video, Daniel Gilligan, senior research fellow at IFPRI and leader of PIM's research flagship “Social Protection for Agriculture and Resilience”, discusses why social protection programs, such as cash transfers, food rations, school meals, and public works are now a leading strategy that governments use to help reduce poverty and help households to become more resilient.

International Day of Rural Women: Women’s land rights need to be at heart of tenure reforms to help eradicate poverty

Why are land rights so important to rural women? Quite simply, land is the most valuable asset among many rural people and households, as land is the foundation of rural livelihoods.

New paper discusses women’s land rights as a pathway to poverty reduction

The new IFPRI discussion paper reviews the literature on women's land rights (WLR) and poverty reduction. It adapts the Gender, Agriculture and Assets Project (GAAP) conceptual framework to identify pathways by which WLR could reduce poverty and increase wellbeing of women and their households in rural areas.

Karen Brooks: agricultural research contributes to rural prosperity directly and indirectly

In this video recorded at this year's ISPC Science Forum 2016, Karen Brooks, director of the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM) identifies several research-based pathways to rural prosperity, including direct income effects via new technologies and indirect economy-wide effects resulting from greater agricultural production.