Which agricultural technologies will safeguard our food supply?

This commentary was originally published on the Global Food for Thought, the official blog of the Global Agricultural Development Initiative. (http://shar.es/VqcyC) It relates to the book by Rosegrant et al. (2014) and the Agritech Toolbox recently released by IFPRI as part of the PIM program (Flagship 3, Adoption of Technology and Sustainable Intensification). We are >> Read more

IFPRI 2020 Conference: Side Event on Enhancing Resilience in African Drylands: Toward a Shared Development Agenda

PIM's Director Karen Brooks will facilitate a side event of the IFPRI 2020 Conference, "Enhancing Resilience in African Drylands: Toward a Shared Development Agenda", organized by World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). 

Building Resilience Tops Agenda at Global Conference in Ethiopia

cross-posted from IFPRI Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 13, 2014—Poor countries and vulnerable people are facing a barrage of shocks: economic shocks such as volatile food prices and financial crises; environmental shocks and natural disasters such as droughts, floods, and earthquakes; food safety, diseases, and health shocks; and social and political shocks such as conflicts and >> Read more

Agricultural Transformation and Food Security in Central Asia

cross-posted from UCA The University of Central Asia’s Institute of Public Policy and Administration (IPPA) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) co-hosted a conference on Agricultural Transformation and Food Security in Central Asia, 8-9 April, 2014 in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, engaging  government officials, development partners and researchers from the region and abroad in >> Read more

Cash, food, or vouchers? Evidence from a randomized experiment in northern Ecuador

“Cash, food, or vouchers? Evidence from a randomized experiment in northern Ecuador”, a paper by Melissa Hidrobo (IFPRI), John Hoddinott (IFPRI), Amber Peterman (University of North Carolina), Amy Margolies (IFPRI), and Vanessa Moreira (The World Bank), recently published in the Journal of Development Economics, compares the impacts and cost-effectiveness of the three different approaches.