Cash transfers and intimate partner violence

Cash transfers are a promising tool to reduce intimate partner violence, but can they be effective across diverse contexts and program design? In this blog, Melissa Hidrobo and Shalini Roy identify three policy-relevant knowledge gaps related to the potential of transfer programs to reduce IPV, then address them drawing on case studies from Ecuador, Bangladesh, and Mali.

Measuring the unintended benefits of a development program

Development programs often have a bigger impact than we intend – or even measure. The Transfer Modality Research Initiative in Bangladesh not only led to improved food security and nutrition, but also had a range of unintended benefits. In this Devex oped, our social protection team colleagues explain how this happened.

Transfer programs, child nutrition, and intimate partner violence

In this interview, recorded as part of our series "Why is social protection important for agriculture and resilience? Watch our colleagues explain!", Dr. Shalini Roy discusses how transfer programs can affect nutrition and gender relations in a household, and what role behavior change communication has to play.

Webinar: Cash transfer programs and intimate partner violence – Lessons from 3 case studies around the globe

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is the most pervasive form of violence globally—with 1 in 3 women physically or sexually abused by a partner in her lifetime. Several recent studies find evidence that cash transfer programs, targeted primarily to women, can reduce IPV. In this webinar, we will describe a framework for potential pathways through which transfers can affect IPV and showcase results from 3 studies (Ecuador, Bangladesh, and Mali).

Cash or food transfers combined with behavior change communication reduce intimate partner violence: evidence from Bangladesh

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is widespread globally, with estimates showing that nearly 1 in 3 adult women worldwide have experienced some form of IPV. South Asia has among the highest regional rates in the world, with 41 percent prevalence of IPV. In Bangladesh, one survey found that 72.6 percent of married women reported experiencing violence at the hands of their husbands, and another showed that 74 percent of men reported inflicting violence on their wives.