Farmer-to-farmer extension approach in Malawi: a survey of lead farmers

It’s been noticed that farmers learn best from their peers, or those of a slightly higher social status*. The objective of the study described in the recent World Agroforestry Center working paper “The Farmer-to-Farmer Extension Approach in Malawi: A Survey of Lead Farmers” by Stanley Khaila, Frank Tchuwa, Steven Franzel and Brent Simpson, was to >> Read more

Evaluating potential for conservation agriculture in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Malawi

Conservation agriculture (CA) is being promoted as an option for reducing soil degradation, conserving water, enhancing crop productivity, and maintaining yield stability. However, CA is a knowledge- and technology-intensive practice, and may not be feasible or may not perform better than conventional agriculture under all conditions and farming systems. 

Is another Asian-style Green Revolution good for Africa?

“Assuming Africa is an appropriate setting for another Asian-style Green Revolution is misleading and could result in, yet again, a frustrated attempt to attain sustainable agricultural growth,” says IFPRI Senior Research Fellow Alejandro Nin-Pratt, lead author of the study that just received the Elsevier Atlas Award. 

Savouring diversity: supporting community seedbanks in South Africa’s smallholder farming areas

For ages, rural farmers have maintained local seeds, and through them crop biodiversity, using indigenous knowledge passed to them by their ancestors. Farmers select, plant, harvest, clean and store their seeds to feed their families and keep some for the next planting season. They also exchange and share seeds with their neighbors, friends, extended families. >> Read more

First IAAE 2015 Carl K. Eicher Award for Best Doctoral Dissertation

Family, friends and colleagues of the late Carl K. Eicher have established a fund under the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE) to support an award for the best doctoral dissertation on Africa to honor the outstanding contributions of the late Professor Eicher to African agricultural research and education.