access to land

ACCESS TO LAND

Webinar
In this webinar on July 2, Dr. Hosaena Ghebru will present findings from a recent set of studies on land tenure and perceived tenure security from Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, and Nigeria.
Blog
Land tenure rights are widely recognized as being central to advancing sustainable development goals, but they are only one part of the picture. As it happens, tenure rights to trees are entangled with, but different from, those to land, meaning both must be acknowledged to incentivize stewardship of the landscape by local communities.
Blog
Land can have multiple uses with complicated, often contentious, overlapping boundaries. A forest can be the site of agricultural production, while a wetland can provide valuable nutrition in the form of aquatic protein. So what happens when multiple players are vying for land and its various uses, while continuously contesting the overlapping boundaries?
Blog
How does the amount of land that youth expect to inherit affect their migration and employment decisions? The new AJAE article by Kosec et al. explores this question in the context of rural Ethiopia.
Blog
Why are land rights so important to rural women? Quite simply, land is the most valuable asset among many rural people and households, as land is the foundation of rural livelihoods.
Blog
Tenure security is believed to be critical in spurring agricultural investment and productivity. Yet what improves or impedes tenure security is still poorly understood. The new paper by Hosaena Ghebru and Isabel Lambrecht analyses the main factors associated with farmers’ perceived tenure security in Ghana.
Blog
This webinar by Prof. Thomas Jayne (MSU) on May 23, 2017 highlighted the causes and consequences of changing farm size
EnGendering Data Blog
With increased recognition of the importance of gender in development, researchers now often collect data disaggregated at the individual or intra-household level. But are we asking the right questions and making the right conclusions?
Blog
In this post I argue that qualitative field work aiming at understanding the local context is not a frivolous activity.