Do men and women benefit equally from technology adoption? New paper explores

Researchers have sought to understand what keeps women’s observed rates of agricultural technology adoption low. But what happens after a new technology is adopted by a household? Do women’s lives really become better? Are they more empowered? A new paper explores these questions using the example of adopting small-scale irrigation technologies in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Tanzania.

Gender research in PIM: rural transformation, productivity, and women’s empowerment

In this video, Cheryl Doss, leader of our “Cross-cutting Gender Research and Coordination” flagship, talks about the three big issues the flagship is focusing on, and the team’s contribution to developing methods for collecting sex-disaggregated data for better gender analysis.

Webinar: Women in agriculture: Four myths

Sustainable Development Goal 5 on gender equality and women’s rights and at least 11 of the 17 SDGs require indicators related to gender dynamics. Despite the need for reliable indicators, stylized facts on women, agriculture, and the environment persist. During this webinar we will focus on four gender myths: 1) 70% of the world’s poor are women; 2) Women produce 60 to 80% of the world’s food; 3) Women own 1% of the world’s land; and 4) Women are better stewards of the environment.

CGIAR on International Women’s Day – a day to educate and to celebrate

In advance of International Women’s Day this year we spoke with our Director Karen Brooks about the gender research in CGIAR, its role in PIM, and why, in Karen's opinion, "quality, opportunism (in the good sense of the term), and voice" are important for the gender research to achieve the greatest impact.

Webinar: Cash transfer programs and intimate partner violence – Lessons from 3 case studies around the globe

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is the most pervasive form of violence globally—with 1 in 3 women physically or sexually abused by a partner in her lifetime. Several recent studies find evidence that cash transfer programs, targeted primarily to women, can reduce IPV. In this webinar, we will describe a framework for potential pathways through which transfers can affect IPV and showcase results from 3 studies (Ecuador, Bangladesh, and Mali).