Do men and women benefit equally from technology adoption? New paper explores

Researchers have sought to understand what keeps women’s observed rates of agricultural technology adoption low. But what happens after a new technology is adopted by a household? Do women’s lives really become better? Are they more empowered? A new paper explores these questions using the example of adopting small-scale irrigation technologies in Ethiopia, Ghana, and Tanzania.

Disentangling natural resource management impacts – one evaluation at a time

Last week was a tough one for our small group of IFPRI researchers in Accra. On Tuesday, we delivered a message to one of our partner organizations there that its project to promote integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) to Ghanaian smallholders did not yield any measurable impacts during the course of our two-year evaluation.

What’s driving the growth of agricultural mechanization in Africa

Agricultural mechanization is playing an increasingly important role in Africa’s rural transformation. Recent research in Ghana addresses the relationship of agricultural mechanization and economic transformation and suggests how government policies can support this process.

New paper explores the measurement of women’s autonomy

Is women's participation in the household decisionmaking a good indicator that they also have individual decision-making power? Does autonomy equal empowerment? The new discussion paper by Greg Seymour (PIM/IFPRI) and Amber Peterman (UNICEF Innocenti) seeks to bridge existing gaps in understanding the measurement of women's autonomy through examples from Bangladesh and Ghana.

New study fills a knowledge gap on drivers of perceived land tenure security: Evidence from Ghana

Tenure security is believed to be critical in spurring agricultural investment and productivity. Yet what improves or impedes tenure security is still poorly understood. The new paper by Hosaena Ghebru and Isabel Lambrecht analyses the main factors associated with farmers’ perceived tenure security in Ghana.