Webinar recording: What determines public budgets for agricultural growth in the developing world?

Our fourth webinar in the 2017 series posed some very important questions: How much do governments invest in agriculture? Are these expenditures worth it? And what are the reasons for under-investment? We thank Tewodaj Mogues (IFPRI) for the excellent presentation and all live participants for attention and very interesting discussion.

Webinar: What determines public budgets for agricultural growth in the developing world?

When: 26 September 2017, 11:00 AM EST
Presenter: Tewodaj Mogues, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI
Why do policymakers often tend to neglect agricultural investments with proven high returns, such as agricultural R&D, while types of agricultural public spending with much more limited welfare impact, such as agricultural input subsidies, gain strong budgetary attention?

Piecing together the puzzle of underinvestment in agriculture

Tolulope Olofinbiyi and Tewodaj Mogues (IFPRI) are sharing insights from a qualitative study of subnational government spending in Nigeria. 

How is SPEED being applied in research?

Cross-posted from IFPRI Research Blog Public investment has gained importance in development in recent years. In the Malabo Declaration on African Agriculture and CAADP from 2014, heads of state and government of the African Union recommitted to uphold the target of allocating 10 percent of total spending to agriculture, as originally agreed in the 2003 >> Read more

Discussion paper: A systematic review of cross-country data initiatives on agricultural public expenditures in developing countries

One of the most important instruments that developing and transitioning countries possess to achieve the transformation of their economies through meeting key development outcomes and impacts, especially where the agricultural sector plays a key role, is efficient and effective agricultural public expenditures (AgPEs), coupled with a conducive policy environment and dynamic private investments. Practitioners and >> Read more